The Importance Of Child Vaccination Against The Whooping Cough

By Charles Duke – info resourced from http://www.mumslounge.com.au/lifestyle/health/2743-whooping-cough-vaccine-and-cocooning-to-improve-baby-immunisation.html

09Whooping cough can be transmitted easily by an infected person to another by sneezing or coughing. When the infected person sneezes or coughs without covering his or her mouth, airborne droplets can be transferred to people around. Anyone who has not been vaccinated is very likely to contract the disease just by being in the same room with the infected person. Because the disease is highly contagious, if one member of a family gets it, the other members are highly likely to become infected if they have not already been vaccinated or have not already had whooping cough before.

How serious is the disease?

Whooping cough is most dangerous for young children and babies. Babies who are below 1 year and get the disease need care in the hospital because it can be deadly. 1 out of 4 hospitalized babies with the disease will get pneumonia. Whooping cough can also lead to seizures and brain damage.

How to prevent the infection?

There is no cure for the disease. Our best defence against whooping cough is the whooping cough vaccine. The vaccine protects children by preparing their bodies in fighting the bacteria. It is important for your children to get all the doses of the whooping cough vaccine to ensure their full protection. Although some children who are vaccinated can still get the disease, it is usually a milder case. Adults and teens who did not get the whooping cough vaccine as pre-teens should get the booster vaccine to avoid the risk of getting and spreading the disease.